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January 10, 2010

The Known Universe


After hovering over Mount Everest and the gorges that plunge to the Ganges, you are pulled through the Earth’s atmosphere to glimpse the inky black of space over Tibet’s high desert. So begins The Known Universe, a new film produced by the American Museum of Natural History that is part of a new exhibition, Visions of the Cosmos: From the Milky Ocean to an Evolving Universe, at the Rubin Museum of Art in New York City.

The structure of The Known Universe is based on precise, scientifically-accurate observations and research.

This is really awe inspiring. I have a huge interest in space and I love watching what I can see from my back yard looking up and envisioning beyond.

20 comments:

Eternally Distracted said...

I love all things starry! We went to the desert for New Year purely to see the fabbarooney sky!

Shadow said...

give me stars and the moon any day...

Lou said...

My husband dreams of retirement, an expensive telescope, and a place without light pollution!

Beth said...

I love space. When I look up at the skies, it makes me feel so small. Usually, I need to hang on the grass to keep grounded.

janeywan said...

We are just specks of sand.
Love the clip!

DJan said...

I look at Astronomy Picture of the Day and gain perspective on the trials and tribulations of everyday life. Hello to another Space Junkie! Thanks for the link.

otin said...

In the summer, I will sometimes just sit out in the back yard and stare at the stars, maybe hoping to see something unusual, and then I realize that it is all unusual to begin with!

Brian Miller said...

oh i love this stuff...totally grew up dreaming of joining hte enterprise on a 5 year mission. fab!

smiles4u said...

One of my most favotite things is to lay on a blanket outside and look up at the stars. My little ones love doing this. When the moon seems very small they call it a baby moom. If it's some what big, they call it a mommy moom. When it's big,bright and really orange they call it a daddy moom.

Growing up, we would lay out in an open field in the pitch dark and just look at the sky. Amazing!

Yousei Hime said...

Tecnobabe,
Thanks for stopping by. I really do love the snow. Growing up in south Texas, we never saw snow. I love the untouched fields and snowy pine branches. I'm ready for a change by mid-February, though. Snow in April, just too weird for this Texas girl.

Video sounds great. Someday I'll catch up techno-wise and be able to view all these cool snippets everyone posts. Stay warm.

Ronda Laveen said...

Is it a part of the series "The Known Universe?" I love that program.

Jeanie said...

Thanks for sharing the video. It was awe inspiring, indeed. The vastness is so unfathomable to me. My son has had his eyes on the stars since he was a little boy and he is now an astrophysicist.

Spencer L Casey said...

Very cool video. My kids loved it.

gayle said...

Loved the video!! kinda hard to believe

Unknown Mami said...

Fascinating!

lisleman said...

thanks so much for posting that. Maybe if you have time you could stop over at A Few Clowns and click on the 'space' tag.

I know there are many important female scientists (a post of mine from last year talks about one) but for whatever reason (culture I think) they are vastly outnumbered. This makes your post even more interesting to me. I wish more people would get turned on by space and science.

One more comment - you probably know this - if you could somehow take a light speed return trip similar to that you would younger when you came back than all the people you left.

Pseudonymous High School Teacher said...

I feel like I'm floating...

Ina in Alaska said...

I love gazing at the starry sky on a clear chilly evening in Anchorage Alaska..... sometimes treated to the Northern Lights which are very mysterious and beautiful.....xoxo

therapydoc said...

I gotta' go!

Julie said...

This is awesome. I'll have to pass it along to my daughter who lives in NYC. Check out this link http://blastthemovie.com/about.html

My daughter worked as an Associate Producer on the documentary. Here's a little synopsis I copied from their website:

"Filmmaker Paul Devlin follows the story of his brother, Mark Devlin PhD, as he leads a tenacious team of scientists hoping to figure out how all the galaxies formed by launching a revolutionary new telescope under a NASA high-altitude balloon."

It's a way cool film and has her name in the credits at the end, so that makes me smile:) Thanks for the link!