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April 09, 2011

Some People Don't Get To Be-Bop Through Life

A lone flower is propped up by a boot at a shoe installation marking International Day for Landmine Awareness at Simon Bolivar Square in Bogota, Colombia April 4. On each of the more than 9,000 shoes is the name of a land mine victim representing those injured in Colombia. Colombia is second to Afghanistan as the nation with the largest number of victims. (Fernando Vergara/Associated Press)

The more I wake up and smell the flowers in my life through my ongoing recovery, the more aware I am of other people. In my closed in little life I always said Columbia was one place I would never want to live. My previous husband and I almost moved to Belize about twenty years ago but after much investigation and meetings with other people living in Belize, I was the one who just would not live so close to Columbia.

Then I saw this photo today and cried for my fellow human beings who have lived and died in Columbia. I had a choice and most of them did not. I will keep this photo handy and when I feel sorry for myself, contemplating the hardships of others will take the focus off me. I am a card carrying member of the human race. We are all in this thing called life together.

31 comments:

Ocean Girl said...

Hello Technobabe,

At first I thought they were marker stones. We created dangerous weapons, weapons for cowards.

Brian Miller said...

wow. the symbolism is powerful and almost overwelming just to think...big proponant of looking beyond one self at those around them...

Jeanie said...

What a powerful reminder of the tragedy of land mines and of the oneness of the human race.

DJan said...

Yes, that is a very powerful picture, TB. I also contemplate my on very fortunate life and give thanks for it, as well as wishing it were the same for everyone. Land mines are terrible things.

Whitney Lee said...

This is powerful. You're right; so many don't have choices. We take far too much for granted. I sometimes look at my life and wonder when tragedy is going to strike. Then I just cry thankfulness for all those I love.

Kristina P. said...

What a strong memorial.

Ms. A said...

Makes us realize how lucky we are. My dad survived a land mine, in WWII. He was lucky and kept his life and limbs. He carried the shrapnel as a constant reminder. It could have been much, much worse.

Stickup Artist said...

The Artist who thought to place the shoes vertically, , and line them up like like grave markers is a genius! I do not think I will ever forget this image nor the message

heartinsanfrancisco said...

That's terribly sad and tragic. We all need reminders that our lives are pretty darn good compared to many around the world. I will also keep that image in mind when I feel sorry for myself, as I seem to do a lot lately, and remind myself that if I am living indoors with food to eat, seated at my computer, how bad could it be? Thanks for the much-needed shock therapy. I wish such pain and loss were not an everyday part of so many lives.

Robert the Skeptic said...

There are so many areas of the world where long-forgotten land minds are still killing and maiming people.

beth said...

this is a good reminder for all of us....

Eileen said...

I remember when Princess Di had brought to the attention of the world the havoc that land mines play on the lives of so many people. And now, so many years later this atrocity still goes on.

I often think about how Blessed I am compared to the rest of the world and wonder why that is. And, more, I wonder why I take it so for granted ninety-nine percent of the time.

Great post.
All the best,
Eileen
PS ~ Ray's father lost his leg in WWII. He was a 'mine sweeper' and while doing his job his Captain called to him, Harry got distracted and stepped on a mine. He lost his leg right below his knee (was forced to take his own knife and cut the muscle when the medic couldn't bring himself to do it). He came back to America and went back into construction work (he was a dock builder in New York), and he was a good, strong worker. His coworkers dubbed him "Harry the Horse". The government had trained him to make wallets. Can you imagine?

Unknown Mami said...

I'm all choked up. Solidarity all the way.

Casey Freeland said...

Loved the last sentence of this post the most. So true and ignored by so many. Thank you for sharing this.

Cheers,

Casey

Joanna Jenkins said...

What a powerful image. It really gave me pause-- I knew it was for something sad but I actually hesitated a moment before I read your post. Wow.

I've never heard of this memorial before. Thanks for passing it on along with the reminder about the human race.

Hope you and James are enjoying your weekend. xo jj

secret agent woman said...

That's really sad. What a powerful memorial.

Maggie May said...

Oh MY Goodness... that is such a powerful picture and what a wonderful (though tragic) way of remembering these horrible devices and the price innocent humans have to pay.
Maggie X

Nuts in May

Dave King said...

Now that is what I call an installation. I can see the point of it and it is immediately effective. Furthermore, I can see it as a piece of art.

Hilary said...

Beautifully expressed, TB. And what a powerful image that is.

Gary's third pottery blog said...

poignant pic, poignant words :)

Shrinky said...

Oh Technobabe, I hope you know how wonderful you are? Thanks for this post, I needed it today. (x)

(Ha! Word Verification - stain.)

Momma Fargo said...

Wow. Very powerful pic. Thanks for sharing the story and pic...very eerie the amount of victims.

lisleman said...

A terrible left over from war that continues to kill. Thanks for reminding us. I have heard they have developed better mine sweepers to clear this dangerous stuff. Innocent victims should not be victims. Do you follow any of the groups trying to clear this stuff?

Rock Chef said...

Landmines are nasty things - I wish there was some way to make the companies that make them responisble for the clean up. But that will never happen. Also I guess there are various improvised mines that are just as deadly.

It is amazing how we can become totally focused on ourselves, isn't it? It does us all good to open our eyes and see what else is going on.

Shadow said...

pause for thought. thank you!

Margie said...

Such a powerful image!
So sad and tragic!

Jillsy Girl said...

That is a very powerful photo!

blueviolet said...

We most certainly are in this together. That is a truly remarkable scene right there.

Kazzy said...

Very very poignant

Syd said...

Yes, we are all in this together, trying to live. We do have the power of choice which is awesome.

The Absence of Alternatives said...

Thank you for this reminder. Really. Some days I really do think I deserve a nice slap to my face to quit my whining.